Escape your home for a safe holiday staycation

With the 2020 holidays upon us, it’s likely you’ve spent some time considering how you’ll have a COVID-safe celebration. Should you stay? Should you go? Is travel to your family even an option this year as some states impose new travel restrictions and mandatory quarantine periods?

Perhaps for safety’s sake, you’ve decided to stay put. But you also recognize that being “home for the holidays” doesn’t have the same cozy appeal as it used to when you’ve already been home working from home for months on end. What you might need is a staycation – the getaway for when you can’t get away.

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Get away for the holidays without going away

Traditionally, when we think about holiday travel, we’re most likely planning how to get ourselves to a faraway destination – whether that’s to see family across the country, or to flee from some combination of family, holiday hustles and winter weather.

This year, I’ve personally decided I won’t be among the holiday crowds attempting to fly on the busiest travel days of the year. Instead, I’ll be sticking closer to home, celebrating in my own city with a staycation – and testing a theory that there is no place like a Hyatt for the holidays.

If you’re planning to stay close to home like me, here’s some good news: Your credit card points work just as well for living it up in luxury in your hometown as they do when you’re on the road.

Some more good news: You’ll save lots of points and dollars by not flying anywhere this holiday – so go ahead and book the suite!

How to use your credit card points to book a staycation

If you live in or near a city, finding a hotel to tuck into for a few days over the holiday period should be pretty straightforward.

To plan a staycation, I normally start by checking what’s available near me by searching the website for each of the hotel groups in whose loyalty programs I participate.

Here in my hometown of Portland, Oregon, I found plenty of options at varying price points when I looked up Marriott, IHG, Hilton and Hyatt – the four hotel programs in which I currently have points.

For example, a few weeks ago, I decided to take an early holiday staycation at the Hyatt Centric Downtown Portland. I chose the hotel because of its location right in the middle of the city, and because Hyatt has a 25% points-back offer on award stays and free parking for The World of Hyatt Credit Card holders through the end of the year.

I paid 30,000 World of Hyatt points for a two-night stay, got 7,500 points back, and got upgraded to a suite thanks to my World of Hyatt elite status. Without points, the suite would have cost $355 dollars a night – plus the free valet parking saved me another $47 a day. I was able to get a $804 value for 22,500 rewards points. Even though I was less than two miles from my actual house, I felt a world away.

How to use travel rewards to book a staycation

If you don’t already have a hotel-branded rewards credit card for earning points in a specific hotel program like World of Hyatt, or if you live in a location where there aren’t many chain hotels, you’ll likely have more luck booking a staycation using travel rewards points.

You can book directly through the respective program’s travel planning portal. Flexible bank programs include Chase Ultimate Rewards, American Express Membership Rewards and Citi ThankYou points.

Once you find a hotel you want to visit, and before you make the booking, you’ll want to check to make sure the hotel amenities that excite you for your staycation are going to be open and accessible.

Other than being snuggled up in a warm bed that I didn’t make myself, the best part of my staycation weekend at the Hyatt Centric Portland was the food.

Masia, the hotel’s signature restaurant designed by Portland’s award-winning Spanish chef Jose Chesa, was finally open and serving after a long COVID closure. Since I live in a city where indoor dining still hasn’t made a full comeback (and is now taking a pause for the holiday season), it was a rather delightful experience to spend two mornings lingering over a long breakfast.

If you’re booking more than a week in advance, you should also make sure your reservation is flexible or cancelable should your own plans change, or the COVID regulations in your state or county change and require the hotel to amend their offerings.

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10 Minimalist Lifestyle Tips to De-Stress and Save Money

Minimalism has become a popular practice in recent years. When you live as a minimalist, you strive to only use things that serve a purpose. It’s about living simply and having only what you need to go about your daily life. For instance, some people may start a no-spend challenge or only fill their home with items they absolutely need. Not only could you save money, but you can also save time on cleaning and organizing.

Practicing minimalism is an ongoing process. You’ll always find ways to improve and modify your minimalism. To start, evaluate what currently serves a purpose in your life and what may be superfluous. When you practice a minimalist mindset, you’re choosing to live a more focused life. You may start with cleaning up your budget and then move on to organizing your home. Taking the first steps to declutter your life is a big move, but you might need a game plan to make these habits stick.

Many of us may have too much stuff, and may even be spending too much on unnecessary purchases. Establishing a consistent and healthy budget should help you cut down on the things you don’t need and may even reduce your anxiety and stress. To keep track of your minimalist budget, download our app for easy accessibility. If you’re considering doing some decluttering this season, skip to our infographic or keep reading for in-depth tips on practicing a minimalist lifestyle.

Minimalist Lifestyle Starter Tips

When first starting out your journey, it’s important to start small. From changing your shopping habits to going strictly digital, there are lots of ways to switch up your routine. Here are our go-to tips for kickstarting your minimalism journey.

1. Shop Quality, Not Quantity

Minimalism doesn’t mean you never go shopping, it just means you’re more intentional with your purchases. Whether you’re in need of a new pair of running shoes or work pants, invest in quality pieces that will last you a long time. Even though a higher price tag may be less than ideal at the time, you’ll likely save money in the long run by cutting down on frequent purchases. Not to mention, you’ll cut down on waste — one garbage truck of clothes is discarded every second.

2. Digitize Movies and Books

If you’re a big reader or movie watcher, consider going digital with your collection. This will save space in your home and make sure you can always find what you want. Instead of having to go to the store for your next read, you could get it at your fingertips in a couple of clicks. If you like to physically feel the book pages every time you flip the page, consider checking out your local library. You can find all sorts of books at no charge.

3. Eliminate, Eliminate, Eliminate

One of the most important parts of minimalism is cutting down on things you don’t need. To start decluttering, identify what serves a purpose in your life and what doesn’t. From there, start to see how you can cut down items that don’t add value to your life, and then get rid of them entirely. You could test the waters by doing a mindful money challenge before decluttering your whole life.

4. Invest In Reusables

As you start to declutter your home, consider what products could be reused. One simple change could be swapping out your disposable water bottles for a glass reusable one. Or, even bring your reusable takeaway coffee cup with you every time you visit your local cafe. Not only could you get a discount for bringing your own cup, but you’re also helping cut down on single-use products!

5. Give Everything a Place

Once you get into a rhythm, give every item a place. Get creative with storage bins and organizers to ensure you’re able to store exactly what you need. If you don’t have a spot for some of your extras, it may be time to consider if they are items you really need to keep. As your minimalist space falls into place, hold yourself accountable for putting away items once you’re done using them.

Minimalist Lifestyle Tips In-Post Image

5 Money-Saving Minimalism Best Practices to Follow

It’s one thing to start out your minimalism journey, but another to keep your practice going. To live an intentional life, there are some easy practices to follow. Keep reading to see where this could help save you more time, money, and stress.

1. Invest in Experiences

A popular practice in minimalism is prioritizing experiences over buying material items. Some people value the memories created from trips or classes over having the latest gadgets or fashions. Determine where you stand and spend intentionally.

As minimalism may cut down on your “extra” budget expense, you may also have more leeway to spend on other things. With this extra budget, be intentional with where you choose to put your money. Save up your takeaway coffee budget to invest in a weekend away with your family. You may find yourself saving more and spending less time on things that drain your budget.

2. Re-Audit Your Life Frequently

Take time to assess your current spending habits and then consistently review them. Always cut out things that take up space or events that drain your energy. As you get more comfortable, you may find yourself wanting to get rid of things you thought you couldn’t live without. For instance, your cluttered kitchen may be useless if you reach for the same items every time you cook — cut down on the things you haven’t used to make more room to cook.

3. Cut Meaningless Expenses

Turns out, the average American spends $18,000 a year on unnecessary purchases. As you review your budget, you may be able to cut out a large portion of these expenses. For things you may not want to completely eliminate, find inexpensive alternatives. You may swap a vacation across the county for a staycation in the comfort of your backyard.

4. Let Go of What You Can’t Control

Letting go of things you can’t control may seem easier said than done. To find that balance, start by focusing on things you love to do or have. Once you have narrowed down what’s most important to you, focus your energy on that. Being thankful for what you do have may even cut down on your budget. You may find yourself reusing what you do have rather than wanting more.

5. Appreciate What You Have

Practice gratitude and focus on the positives. Instead of scrolling through social media, write out three to five things you’re grateful for. Practicing gratitude first thing in the morning may put you in a positive mood and help you prepare for the day ahead of you. Being grateful for what you have might even cut your urge to overspend on things you don’t need.
could be a minimalist? If so, check out our top TED Talk tips for practicing minimalism and how it may benefit you. Turns out, sometimes living with less could mean so much more.

Sources: Making Sense of Cents | CNBC 1, 2

The post 10 Minimalist Lifestyle Tips to De-Stress and Save Money appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Waltz Away With a Cool Buy! Czech Dance Hall in Omaha Transformed Into a Residence

Omaha Dance HallJoe Braun Photography

A place where people used to dance the polka all night long is available for purchase. Accordion not included.

The property on 13th Street in Omaha, NE, is on the market for $999,900, and offers an array of opportunities for an enterprising buyer.

“Originally, it was a Czechoslovakian dance hall, and then it was converted into a bar,” explains the listing agent, Drew Halvorson.

Built in 1895, the main hall was also a popular restaurant, before an artist and home renovator team purchased the property in 1993 and worked their magic. There are now three separate living spaces on the property.

The former dance hall became their home, and the parking lot was transformed into a 5,000-square-foot garden.

Vines, fountains, and plenty of other interesting touches decorate the space.

“When you first come in the gate, you walk into this very serene and beautiful garden,” Halvorson notes. “Once you get to the center of it, it opens up, and you have a big deck space and little seating areas throughout the entire courtyard.”

Exterior of former dance hall in Omaha, NE

Joe Braun Photography

Exterior

Joe Braun Photography

Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Deck

Joe Braun Photography

Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Deck

Joe Braun Photography

Vines

Joe Braun Photography

Entry

Joe Braun Photography

Interior

Joe Braun Photography

Living space

Joe Braun Photography

Living space

Joe Braun Photography

The main house measures 3,324 square feet, with two bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms. Overhead, the ceilings soar to a height of 20 feet.

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Watch: Back to School? Giant Tennessee Home Was Once an Educational Institution

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“An open floor plan and tons of natural light throughout the whole home from skylights,” Halvorson says, “It’s an entertainer’s dream.”

Living space

Joe Braun Photography

Living space

Joe Braun Photography

Kitchen

Joe Braun Photography

Kitchen

Joe Braun Photography

Kitchen

Joe Braun Photography

Pantry

Joe Braun Photography

The kitchen and dining areas sit just off the main living space. Halvorson touts the kitchen as a great space for gathering.

It has a large island, high-end appliances, a custom range hood, and a pantry with plenty of storage.

Master bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Master bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Bedroom

Joe Braun Photography

Master bedroom and loft area

Joe Braun Photography

Bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

The two large bedrooms are upstairs, at opposite ends of the house, each accessed by a huge staircase.

Halvorson explains that the master bedroom has a fireplace, two walk-in closets on either side, and a huge, wraparound bathroom.

Rooftop view

Joe Braun Photography

A ladder goes up into an additional space that the current owners use as a place for yoga and meditation. A door leads out to a rooftop deck with views of the city skyline.

Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

The guesthouse on the property has two apartments. One has three bedrooms and 1.5 bathrooms, and the other is a basement unit with one bedroom and one bathroom.

Built in 1890, the building was originally called the Settlement House. It was used as a boarding house where immigrants could live until they learned English, found a job, and saved enough money to move out.

Guesthouse bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Both units could provide a buyer with steady revenue to offset the monthly mortgage payment.

“The property itself could provide some very good income,” says the agent.

Halvorson says the larger, two-story unit rents for $1,750 a month, and the smaller one nets about $750.

He’s targeting investors and adds that the units could serve either as long-term rentals or be offered as a nightly vacation rental.

The Omaha downtown area, zoo, and other attractions are nearby, making the spot attractive for vacation rentals.

Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Aerial view

Joe Braun Photography

Aerial view

Joe Braun Photography

There are also three detached garage spaces, a rarity in the neighborhood known as Little Bohemia.

“A one-car garage is a win in this old historic area of Omaha,” Halvorson says. “When it was originally built, there just were not a lot of garages or carriage houses whatsoever.”

Since the property was once zoned commercial, the new owners could keep the space as residential or convert it back into a bar or other commercial venture.

“The perfect buyer is probably somebody who has the vision for mixed use. Somebody who maybe wants to live in the main house and have some income on the side with the rental property. I think that would be perfect scenario No. 1,” Halvorson notes.

Scenario No. 2, he adds, might be somebody who decided to live in the main house and to turn the second house into a bar and use the courtyard as a beer garden.

Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Entry to courtyard

Joe Braun Photography

Stairs

Joe Braun Photography

Office

Joe Braun Photography

Bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

View from rooftop

Joe Braun Photography

The post Waltz Away With a Cool Buy! Czech Dance Hall in Omaha Transformed Into a Residence appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

VA Loan Myths

Because of their complexity relative to other mortgage programs, VA loans are the subject of plenty of different myths. Some of these myths are based on truths, but what you hear can end up being very misleading, and it could be entirely untrue.

If you were to take these myths at face value without doing your own research, you might miss out on one of the best mortgage products available. Here’s the truth to some of the biggest myths surrounding VA loans:

Click to check today’s VA rates.

Myth #1: VA loans can only be used once

Because of how useful VA loans can be, some people believe they’re too good to be true. The myth VA loans can only be used once is completely false, but it’s easy to see where this mistaken idea might have come from. If you currently have a VA loan, you are not eligible for a second one.

However, this doesn’t mean you aren’t eligible for a second VA loan ever again.

Once you pay off your current VA loan, you’re eligible to use the program again. There are some small differences after the first time, such as a slightly higher cost at closing. But aside from the small differences, your second VA loan will be similar to the first one that you paid off.

Myth #2: VA members are guaranteed a mortgage

Nobody is guaranteed any type of mortgage, regardless of which mortgage program they’re applying for or whether they’re veterans. You must be approved for a mortgage, which means — depending on which program you choose — meeting credit requirements and having a specific debt-to-income ratio, among other factors.

When a lender says a VA loan is “guaranteed,” they mean the VA backs the loan. The VA guarantee is there to tell veterans they can get a mortgage with no required down payment, competitive mortgage rates and other benefits.

You can learn more about what “guaranteed” means here.

Myth #3: VA appraisals are impossible to pass

It is true that VA appraisals can be stricter than an appraisal with a different mortgage type. But that doesn’t mean they’re impossible to pass, and many VA home buyers don’t have any trouble with the VA appraisal at all. Because the VA is backing the home, they want to confirm it’s in good and livable condition before they approve any type of loan.

If you are applying for a VA loan and want to have a quick, speedy appraisal process, check here for some tips on how to pass the appraisal.

Check your VA eligibility.

Myth #4: Today’s home prices require a higher down payment

There’s no denying home prices have increased over the past decade. This has made homes harder to afford for many would-be home buyers, since down payments are usually used to lower the costs of monthly payments. The higher the downpayment, the lower the monthly payments.

Here’s the truth: with a VA loan, you don’t need to make a down payment and you can still afford a house. The key to buying an affordable home isn’t the size of the down payment, but finding a home within your means.

Many VA members purchase a home without a large down payment. In March, the average down payment for a VA loan was just two percent – below the minimum 3.5% required by FHA loans, and much lower than the traditional 20%.

While a larger down payment will lower your monthly costs, you probably don’t need to make a larger downpayment to be eligible for a VA loan.

Myth #5: VA loans take forever

When comparing FHA loans, conventional loans and VA loans, VA loans are typically the slowest program. According to mortgage software giant Ellie Mae’s October 2020 Origination Report, VA loans took an average of 54 days to close.

By comparison, FHA loans took 52 days to close, and conventional loans took an average of 54 days as well.

So yes, a VA loan is likely going to take longer to close than another program. However, a difference of 2-3 days is small when you consider how much lower VA rates are.

VA loans are slower than other mortgage types, but they do not take forever.

Click to start the VA home buying process.

Myth #6: Surviving spouses don’t qualify for VA mortgages

Actually, many spouses of veterans can qualify for a VA home loan.

Generally, the spouse must be un-remarried and the veteran must have died during service or from service-connected causes. But there are exceptions and other ways a surviving spouse can be eligible.

And, surviving spouses are exempt from paying the VA funding fee. To confirm your eligibility, your VA loan officer will request your Certificate of Eligibility (COE) and verify that it has Entitlement Code 06.

Myth #7: All realtors are good VA home loan advisors

There is no VA loan certification for real estate agents. As a result, you shouldn’t look to your real estate agent for reliable information about VA loans. And an underinformed real estate agent can unintentionally push VA-eligible borrowers towards programs that might be less advantageous for them.

Instead, you should get your VA loan facts from a VA specialty lender whose primary product is VA-backed loans.

The VA loan facts are hard to beat

The proliferation of myths about VA loans can obscure the fact this is simply one of the best loan products available to aspiring home buyers.

The VA loan rates available to eligible buyers — combined with the low down payments — are hard to beat with a conventional or FHA loan. But with a little research and a well-informed VA lender, you could be on your way to a VA home loan.

Click to check today’s VA rates.

Source: militaryvaloan.com

Say Farewell to Shag Carpet—Family Tackles 1970s Time Capsule Makeover

Jacksons Time CapsuleDustin McKibben

A Florida family has embarked on a wild ride to bring a 1970s time capsule in Indiana into the 21st century.

On a whim, they bought a vintage gem in Fort Wayne, IN, covered top to bottom in shag carpet, after seeing it online. It was our most popular home of the week in early December and garnered hundreds of thousands of views—the Jackson family among them.

How the time capsule was won

“So we weren’t actually looking for a home to buy,” says Alysha Jackson, who lives in Clermont, FL, with her husband, Nate, two toddlers, and a rescue dog, Ingrid.

“We have a home there and we love it,” she says. “We had talked about getting into real estate one day, but it wasn’t really on our radar yet. Then this house went viral.”

Nate saw the house online and came in with his computer to show the listing to Alysha.

“He’s like, ‘Hey, don’t shut this down right away, but what if we put in an offer on this house?’” she says.

“Usually, I’m the skeptical one, but I just looked at it and had this gut feeling, and I said, ‘You know what? I actually love it. Let’s put in an offer.’”

Interior of home in Fort Wayne, IN

Dustin McKibben

Interior

Dustin McKibben

Bathroom

Dustin McKibben

Like everyone who laid eyes on the photos, Nate and Alysha first spotted the colorful carpet. The deep shag is hard to miss: It’s everywhere, even on some of the walls.

Alysha says her first reaction was: “Whoa, that’s a lot of shag carpet!” Then, she noticed how much potential the house had.

“I kind of envisioned what it could look like with some renovating,” she says. “We’re staying thing true to the vibe of it and the time period, but we have to update it.”

Aftermath of Christmas

Jackson family

Door

Dustin McKibben

Jackson family

Dustin McKibben

The Jacksons journey back in time

Just a few weeks after putting in their offer, the two former teachers, who now sell on Amazon, packed up their family minivan (including Christmas presents) and headed north. Their work offers them the freedom to work where they choose.

Since then, the family has been living bare-bones in the house, with just a few mattresses and other essential items. They have decided to live in the home as is for a while.

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Watch: Listing Agents Answer Our Burning Questions About the ‘Silence of the Lambs’ House

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“We wanted to just stay in it a little while before changing anything, because we just wanted to get a feel for the house before we just came in and made sweeping changes,” Alysha Jackson explains.

“I’m so glad we did, because we actually changed a lot of our designs based upon actually living in the home for a little bit first.”

Most importantly, they staged a 1970s-style photo shoot.

Interior

Dustin McKibben

Enjoying the view

Jackson family

Even Ingrid, the dog, seems to have settled in.

“She has a spot in the house where she can see the entire yard, thanks to the surrounding sliding doors and windows,” Jackson says.

“Ingrid was so sad when she saw us packing the van for our trip here, but literally jumped up and down when we got the leash out and she realized she was coming with us on the trip.”

Kitchen

Dustin McKibben

Kitchen

Dustin McKibben

Kitchen

Dustin McKibben

The former owner of the house, James Sherbondy, a retired architect, designed the home as his family’s personal residence. It was occupied until just a few months ago, so everything inside was in working order.

“We walked in, brought in our stuff, and used the fridge. The bathrooms were functional. It was pretty great,” Jackson says.

Everything in the kitchen works, and the cabinets are in good shape. However, the layout may not work for the family, she adds.

Lower level

Dustin McKibben

Lower level

Dustin McKibben

Lower-level bathroom

Dustin McKibben

Lower-level bathroom

Dustin McKibben

The family made some immediate changes for safety reasons and are currently living on the lower level. They’re tackling that and the main level first, and leaving the upstairs master bedroom and bathroom for last.

A bathroom with green counters and blue sink will ultimately meet its demise, but the Jack-and-Jill style entry is staying.

“The more we see, the more we want to keep, which is kind of funny,” Alysha says. “Before, we didn’t really know too much about ’70s style, and we didn’t know too much about midcentury modern even. But the more I talk with people and more research I do on my own, the more I see the beauty and the value in it, and so I want to keep that style in the home.”

Stairs

Dustin McKibben

Toddler-proof stairs

Dustin McKibben

The Jacksons have sought input from a number of experts on the Instagram account they started for their rehab project. They had hopes of reaching 10,000 followers by the summer. As of now, they’ve blown past their goal and have over 30,000 folks tracking the renovation journey.

“I just love sharing projects with people. When we did a ’70s photo shoot, we thought it would be really fun to share these. We had no idea it would go viral as quickly as it did,” Jackson says. “It’s been really fun to share what we’re doing with people, and we’ve gotten so much great input.”

Lower level

Dustin McKibben

Lower level

Dustin McKibben

The carpet can’t stay

Sadly, for lovers of colorful floor coverings, the carpet is one of the first things that’s going to go.

“There’s literally carpet in every single room, including the bathrooms. It’s everywhere and it’s 50 years old. From what we know, it is original to the home,” Jackson says.

She added that there are stains in several places, and it doesn’t smell particularly great, especially in the bathrooms.

Eventually, there will be new flooring in many of the rooms and tile in the bathrooms. But the carpet won’t vanish completely.

“I am going to be making an art piece of the different carpet colors,” she says. “There’s about four or five different colors in the home, and we just want to keep a piece of each. I’m going to cut some out from each color—deep-clean it, of course—and then create some sort of art piece with it to hang in the house on the wall.”

Master bathroom

Dustin McKibben

Master bathroom

Dustin McKibben

People on social media had a lot to say about the carpet-bedecked bathtub in the master bedroom. The tub has purple tile and no curtain. For now, it’s the only bathtub in the house, so the kids need to take their baths there.

Jackson says the tub is super clean, but the trick for the couple is to keep the children from enjoying their time on the floor.

“To them, it’s like a big towel,” she adds. The first time their son took a bath, she says, “He got out of the tub and started rolling on the shag carpet.”

Fireplace

Other modifications on the way

Back on the main level, the dramatic floor-to-ceiling fireplace will stay—but with some modifications for safety.

Wood paneling and accents

Dustin McKibben

Some of the wood paneling and carved accents throughout the house will also remain.

“I stare at the wood every day. I think that’s maybe my favorite part of the house,” Jackson says.

Some people on Instagram say the carved wood might be by an artist named Ackerman, and the Jacksons are trying to verify that.

“It’s the first thing you see when you walk in the home on the door,” Alysha says.

Work time

Jackson family

Life outside the box

The Jacksons rehabbed their Florida house, so a huge project isn’t entirely new for them and they have some family support nearby. Both Alysha and Nate are from Indiana, and much of their family still lives there. While some close to them were surprised by the somewhat impulsive purchase, they weren’t shocked.

“We kind of joke with people that Nate and I are ‘Go big or go home’ people. We kind of live life outside the box, so they were excited for us,” Jackson says.

Some relatives thought they were crazy, she adds, but changed their minds when they saw how beautiful the home is—and they’re especially excited that the family will be closer to them.

For now, the family plans to split time between the two homes and rent the other one as a vacation rental.

We’ll be tracking the process of this time capsule transformation and can’t wait to see what’s next.

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A post shared by Alysha and Nate Jackson (@thejacksonfi)

The post Say Farewell to Shag Carpet—Family Tackles 1970s Time Capsule Makeover appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com

Southwest’s A-List and Companion Pass Easier to Earn in 2021

Good news for Southwest Rapid Rewards members — and especially those who earned a Companion Pass in 2019 — was released today: A Companion Pass extension is now in effect. Plus, Southwest announced new ways that Rapid Rewards members can earn status as an A-List, A-List Preferred and/or Companion Pass holder for 2021 and 2022….

nerdwallet.com

The 5 States That Don’t Charge Sales Tax

This story originally appeared on SmartAsset.com. Just as there are several states with no income taxes, there are also multiple states forgoing sales taxes. These states don’t impose state-level sales taxes, meaning you won’t be assessed an additional fee when purchasing a retail good or service. This can make a huge difference in how much you pay for retail items, since rates can range as high…

Source: moneytalksnews.com